Aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people

From this genre comes the concept of tragedy, a concept which is based on the possibility that a person may be destroyed precisely because of attempting to be good and is much better than most people, but not perfect. The nature of tragedy:in the century after sophocles, the philosopher aristotle analyzed tragedy his definition: tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being. Aristotle is without a doubt one of the greatest philosophers of all time, and, along with plato, one of the most influential people in western history raphael's renaissance masterpiece, the school of athens, depicts plato and aristotle walking side by side, surrounded by a number of other philosophers and personalities of antiquity. Tragedy is not only a literary and theatrical practice, but also constitutes an object of contemplation, which has served as an intellectual touchstone for many philosophers and artists among the most influential theorists are plato, aristotle, hegel, schopenhauer, nietzsche, and brecht almost all. Through the life of aristotle, one would wonder how a mere thought of philosophy could impact the way education is practiced today as we know it aristotle's way of life reflected the way he thought and what he wrote for people to view and educate upon today.

aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people Aristotle (384 - 322 bc) was an important greek philosopher from the socratic (or classical) period, mainly based in athenshe is one of the most important founding figures in western philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing ethics, aesthetics, politics, metaphysics, logic and science.

The nature of tragedy the essential question to probe is: why do we enjoy, in some sense, watching tragedies, that is the suffering of people onstage popular use of tragedy as disaster (the plane wreck was a tragedy): this is very different from the technical sense of tragedy, which specifies a particular literary genre of drama in which people suffer. Aristotle conceives of ethical theory as a field distinct from the theoretical sciences its methodology must match its subject matter—good action—and must respect the fact that in this field many generalizations hold only for the most part. A passage in the politics of aristotle bears this out, where the effects of music on some morbid states of mind are talked about the emotions should not be repressed in the poetics, aristotle refers to the curing of religious frenzy.

And of course, the prime mover is relevant here, and that in effect is one of the main effects of aristotle's god on his ethics in this life of contemplation, aristotle says, you get as close to the divine life as you can, because that's all god does, is contemplate. The centerpiece of aristotle's work is his examination of tragedy this occurs in chapter 6 of poetics: tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain. Catharsis (from greek κάθαρσις katharsis meaning purification or cleansing) is the purification and purgation of emotions—particularly pity and fear—through art or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration. Aristotle identifies tragedy as the most refined version of poetry dealing with lofty matters and comedy as the most refined version of poetry dealing with base matters he traces a brief and speculative history of tragedy as it evolved from dithyrambic hymns in praise of the god dionysus.

Aristotle's methods in biology reveal a great deal about his general methods in philosophy he was the son of a doctor, and his work shows a particular aptitude for biology we might contrast this fact with plato's aptitude for mathematics. Aristotle goes on to say that tragedy effects the catharsis of these emotions--in effect arrousing pity and fear only to purge them, as when we exit a scary movie feeling relieved or exhilarated the tragic hero must be essentially admirable and good. Aristotle does understand tragedy as a development out of the child's mimicry of animal noises, but that is in the same way that he understands philosophy as a development out of our enjoyment of sight-seeing (metaphysics i, 1) in each of these developments there is a vast array of possible intermediate stages, but just as philosophy is the. The philosophy of tragedy: from plato to žižek [julian young] on amazoncom free shipping on qualifying offers this book is an exhaustive survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present. Aristotle asserts that if one strings together a set of expressive speeches of a character, one would not produce the essential tragic effect this means that tragic effects would be best brought out through the main characters in any piece of work written.

The basic difference aristotle draws between tragedy and other genres, such as comedy and the epic, is the tragic pleasure of pity and fear the audience feel watching a tragedy in order for the tragic hero to. In the poetics, aristotle's famous study of greek dramatic art, aristotle (384-322 bc) compares tragedy to such other metrical forms as comedy and epiche determines that tragedy, like all poetry, is a kind of imitation (mimesis), but adds that it has a serious purpose and uses direct action rather than narrative to achieve its ends. Tragedy deals with men on a heroic scale, men better than they are in everyday life whereas comedy deals with the more trivial aspects of human nature, with characters 'worse' than they are in real life. The agenda of philosophy pages might also seem to be obvious, given the site's title, and its copious and helpful links to specific areas of aristotelian philosophy, including aristotle's doctrine of the universals, friendship, and other bibliographic sources. Aristotle's definition of tragedy is best seen in the quote: tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious and complete, and which has some greatness about it it imitates in words.

Aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people

Aristotle's views on drama still influence the theatre of today - we still speak of the cathartic effect of tragedy - and his precepts were still taken extremely literally by 17th-century. Aristotle's poetics has many important features, from its influence on literary theory, to the notion of catharsis, to its description of the elements and rules of tragedy before the poetics. A notion of natural inequality is central to aristotle's conception of humanity, with a view to both individual and communal living it is a binding principle in the conception of the city ( polis ) as the highest form of partnership ( koinonia ), and even forms the basis for establishing the necessity of partnership itself.

  • In arabic philosophy, he was known simply as the first teacher in the west, he was the philosopher aristotle's early life aristotle was born in 384 bc in stagira in northern greece.
  • Catharsis, the purification or purgation of the emotions (especially pity and fear) primarily through artin criticism, catharsis is a metaphor used by aristotle in the poetics to describe the effects of true tragedy on the spectator.

Aristotle's poetics is a fragmentary work originally it was a text for use by philosophy students rather than by the general public the part which survives is mostly about tragedy the most notable thing about aristotle's view of the poetical process is that he sees it as an 'imitation' (mimesis. The definition of the essence of tragedy () at the beginning of the sixth chapter of aristotle's poetics runs: [tragedy is the imitation of a good action, which is complete and of a certain length, by means of language made pleasing for each part separately it relies in its various elements. Tragedy, however, is an imitation not only of a complete action, but also of incidents arousing pity and fear ― aristotle, on the art of poetry 5 likes.

aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people Aristotle (384 - 322 bc) was an important greek philosopher from the socratic (or classical) period, mainly based in athenshe is one of the most important founding figures in western philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing ethics, aesthetics, politics, metaphysics, logic and science. aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people Aristotle (384 - 322 bc) was an important greek philosopher from the socratic (or classical) period, mainly based in athenshe is one of the most important founding figures in western philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing ethics, aesthetics, politics, metaphysics, logic and science. aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people Aristotle (384 - 322 bc) was an important greek philosopher from the socratic (or classical) period, mainly based in athenshe is one of the most important founding figures in western philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing ethics, aesthetics, politics, metaphysics, logic and science. aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people Aristotle (384 - 322 bc) was an important greek philosopher from the socratic (or classical) period, mainly based in athenshe is one of the most important founding figures in western philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing ethics, aesthetics, politics, metaphysics, logic and science.
Aristotles philosophy on the effects of tragedy on people
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